Kids and Education

Get your little one school-ready!

Take advantage of the power of role-modelling – children learn from watching. It may not be obvious, but children are much more observant than you could ever imagine.

Digital citizenship/ literacy is the standard of appropriate, responsible technology use and this needs to be part of every child’s education.

Tips on how to choose the right high school for your child

1. Set aside your own issues – Don’t bombard them with stories of your own negative experiences with high school.
2. Get involved – Start having conversations with your child from Grade 5 about the importance of working hard throughout the school year. The marks count, but not just during the exams.
3. Visit each school – It’s vital to visit each school on your long list on its Open Day. These usually take place in the first term of each year.
4. Talk to the educators, current learners and their parents – Many schools will use learners as school guides, so talk to them about their experiences.
5. Look out for extras – Important things to consider about a school are, of course, the academics and the sporting success. Also, consider what arts and drama programme they offer if that’s where your child’s strengths lie.
6. Plan your finances – One of the main things for you to consider when choosing a high school is whether the fees are affordable for your family without having to make too many sacrifices.
7. Go with your gut – It’s a good idea to think of school hunting as you would think of house hunting. There needs to be a chemistry – a gut instinct! If you can’t see your child there, and they can’t see themselves there either, cross it off the list!
8. Choose the right school for YOUR child – It’s important to choose a school for each individual child and her needs and interests.

Talk to your child and instigate conversation. Encourage and help your child to learn how to listen when others speak, as well as how to respond appropriately. Learning to be a good listener is an essential skill in life.

Take your child on simple and more in-depth field trips regularly. The zoo, park, post office, pet store or even the local street markets. All of these examples are ripe with learning potential.

Provide ample opportunities for children to be creative and use their imaginations. Children have a very different take on reality from adults and this gift should be allowed to evolve.

Reasoning or executive functioning skills are often thought to be the key to success. They are the ‘command and control’ functions that determine how you manage life tasks.

Understand that you are the parent and not your child’s friend. Act as a firm but a friendly leader, communicating with your children in a calm manner.

Encourage play-based learning to build a strong foundation for literacy and mathematical concepts. Exposure to these skills in a playful way will get them on the road to being prepared when the time comes.

WATERSONG LEARNING CENTRE

Good nutrition is our mission

The topic of good nutrition has been analysed and discussed by food nutritionists as well as keen fitness experts for many decades. We all know that in order to keep our bodies fit and healthy, we need a proper balanced intake of vitamins, minerals and good old-fashioned exercise. It is extremely important to fuel our children’s brains with the correct ‘brain food’ in order for them to be able to concentrate in class and excel in every aspect of their lives. We love our children, so let’s have a closer look at how we can do the best for them when it comes to food.

How to provide the brain with energy:

The brain works like a complex piece of machinery, and it needs energy to perform optimally. The human brain makes up about two per cent of our total weight, yet it uses about 20 per cent of the energy our bodies generate. If you feed your children a low-energy diet, their brains will not have sufficient energy to combat fatigue, mood swings, loss of concentration and restlessness in class. By contrast, encouraging a high-energy diet will get their ‘computers’ to work smoothly and efficiently, and their overall school experience will be one of success and achievement. For energy, the brain needs plenty of glucose, not to be confused with refined sugars. We should limit the intake of ‘bad sugar’ as this is the biggest culprit in harming the brain’s performance; it actually eats away at the brain’s insulation. Instead, feed your children delicious fruits which are rich in glucose. The brain must generate enough electricity, 25 watts to be precise, the amount needed to run a small lightbulb, in order to send billions of important messages in a minute. The source of that brain-electricity is good food combined with oxygen. The following tips on brain food are an all-round guideline on what to feed your child. Contact Watersong Learning Centre 083 775 4696.

Simple tips on brain food:

1.Eat a good breakfast every morning , preferably fresh fruit. Include a banana which is a rich source of potassium, an orange or kiwi-fruit for vitamin C.
2. Pack a good lunch. A sandwich with avocado and tomato is fantastic for the brain. Any form of veggies will also do wonders. Add protein such as chicken for extra energy, but try to avoid processed meat.
3. Snack. Stay away from sweets and chips, rather give nuts and raisins.
4. Supper. Hold back on too many carbohydrates. One type is enough. Focus on protein, veggies and salads. Remember, make fish a priority and use vegetable ‘fats’ as a key part of your children’s diet.
5. Exercise! Regular exercise will oxygenate the blood.
6. Drink plenty of water. Water cleanses the body of toxins. Steer clear of sugary carbonated drinks.
Article by Desiree van Heerden. Contact Watersong Learning Centre on 083 775 4696 or via email at [email protected] Visit their website at www.watersonglc.co.za.

LITTLE BEAN EARLY
LEARNING CENTRE

The benefits of small community-based schools

With the rapid expansion of the Northsider’s distribution area, there are now many schools to choose from, so how do you know you are choosing the best option for your child? A large school with big sports fields might be the right fit for a sporty, outgoing child, but sometimes a smaller, more intimate school will be a better option, for the following reasons:
– Small schools create a family-like environment where the relationship between the educators and the learners is the primary reason for children succeeding. A good, strong home base is also essential.
– Small schools are called ‘small’ because they have fewer children and smaller classes. The quality of education obtainable from them is the same as, or better than, that of bigger schools. The entire school community is small, which means that everyone in the school is generally known by name. This makes it difficult for a child to get lost or stay unnoticed. Offering a child help in a situation of need is also easier.
Many parents like small schools because children receive individual help, and the educators generally know all the children, not just the ones in their class. From a cognitive point of view, keeping classes small is good because it offers the opportunity to delve deeper into the curriculum and move through it at a faster pace. In a big school, competition is fierce for a few coveted spots; those children who make the team gain a personal investment in the school, while those who don’t make the roster may walk away feeling marginalised. In smaller schools, the chance for learner participation is higher, because learners are required rather than redundant; thus, children in smaller schools (and their families) have more of a stake in their school. Contact Little Bean Early Learning Centre on 011 475 6867.

LEARNWRITE

Assisted learning could be the answer

At some point, you may hear one or more of these shattering statements: Your child is not coping/ on par with his/ her peers in terms of milestone progression/ able to sit still/ able to concentrate/ Your child is a slow learner … The list goes on. What do you do when you are faced with a child who may or may not present with learning difficulties or barriers to learning?
Have your child assessed by an educational psychologist. The outcomes of the assessment will assist you to ascertain which type of school best meets the specific needs of your child (mainstream, assisted learning/ remedial with a CAPS curriculum and small classes or a special needs programme.)
An effective remedial/ assisted-learning school should have small classes. Each class should have a remedial teacher who is able to spend one-on-one time with the learner doing remedial work. Make sure that the school is registered with the Department of Education and that teachers are SACE-accredited.
Most assisted-learning/ remedial schools should aim to rebuild self-esteem; foster enjoyment of learning; provide a complete educational programme; help each child identify his/ her own goals/ targets; identify and reach potential in a child’s strength(s); remedy weaknesses; improve language skills; reach a functional reading age as soon as possible; teach strategies/ skills to assist with spelling; achieve the child’s potential in, and foster an enjoyment of mathematics; motivate each child; stretch without breaking, and return students to the mainstream when ready. If the matter is more serious and the edu- cational psychologist involved recommends a more focused and specialised form of action, then the world of special needs will have to be examined.
Contact LearnWrite on 011 475 1493 for more information.

VINEYARD CHRISTIAN SCHOOL

The value of Christian education for your child

William Taylor wrote the following in a Harvard Business Review article entitled ‘Hire for attitude & train for skill’: “… high-impact organisations that are changing the game in their fields have adopted a range of strategies and business models, but all agree on one core ‘people’ proposition: attitude supersedes skill. One of the biggest challenges companies face is to fill their ranks with executives and front-line employees whose personal values are in sync with the values that make the organisation tick. As a result, they believe that character counts for more than credentials.”
William Taylor, Jim Collins and a myriad leaders from all sectors of society agree with Peter Schutz, the former CEO of Porsche, whose philosophy was to ‘hire character, train skill’. A Christian school education, where teaching children about Jesus is an integral part of the curriculum, does not only enrich the spiritual lives of the learners, but adds value in so many other areas. When learners are taught to embrace Godly characteristics, they are not just being shaped to become more Christ-like – they are equipped with characteristics that are highly sought-after in the workplace.
The value of Christian education is evident in the number of children walking through the doors of solid Christian schools in our country and around the world. As parents, finding a school for your children can be a daunting task.
Pray for the wisdom to discern the added value of a Christian school. Christian schools, not just the Christian parent or church, must strive to raise young men and women who have the attitude of Christ as described in Philippians 2 and the mind of Christ as described in 1 Corinthians 2. For a list of Christian schools on the West Rand, have a look at www.acsi.co.za. Contact Vineyard Christian School ON 087 022 0345.

EXCELSIOR LEARNING CENTRE

Towards a bright future

Is a successful future not what we strive towards? Did all of us know exactly what we wanted to do when we grew up? We’re sure most of you were part of the philosophy of: “Take these subjects in Grade 10 and you will be set for life.” Oh, how wrong they were. Individual skills and abilities are essential when it comes to life decisions. One of the educator’s main objectives is to develop learners and guide them towards a bright future where their particular skills will be needed. Where might we have been if we had received a little more guidance from our teachers and parents? In order to achieve this objective, educators need to build relationships with their learners. They need to work on their weaknesses and build on their strengths. This is difficult to achieve when groups are very large; in smaller classes, educators are able to provide individual attention where needed, specifically in problem areas, like mathematics. We all know how difficult fractions and exponents can be! Another role of the educator is to set the learners up with the requisite tools which will enable them to fare well in interviews and become well-balanced and productive adults. However, we know that without the other two pillars of education, namely the parents and learners themselves, the structure will collapse. Learners and parents have specific roles to play. With parental support and discipline and the learners’ full cooperation, they will leave school fully prepared to set out on the paths they have chosen in life, and achieve excellence through knowledge, structure and discipline. Contact Excelsior Learning Centre on 011 025 6543.

Ten hottest birthday party themes for 2018:

The topic of good nutrition has been analysed and discussed by food nutritionists as well as keen fitness experts for many decades. We all know that in order to keep our bodies fit and healthy, we need a proper balanced intake of vitamins, minerals and good old-fashioned exercise. It is extremely important to fuel our children’s brains with the correct ‘brain food’ in order for them to be able to concentrate in class and excel in every aspect of their lives. We love our children, so let’s have a closer look at how we can do the best for them when it comes to food.

Peppa Pig – This little piggie is a big hit with the petite party crowd!

Trolls – They’re colourful, they’ve got crazy hair, and they love singing, dancing, hugging, and cupcakes.

Shopkins – Shopkins figurines are all about food – tiny jars of jam, little smiling fudgesicles, ice cream cones.

Unicorns – What girl doesn’t love unicorns?

Indoor trampoline party – There are plenty of opportunities for your guests to get their wiggles out all at once!

Superhero party – Have guests come dressed as their favourite superhero!

Baking party – Decorate cupcakes, cookies, you name it!

Art party – Ditch the nice clothes and let your kids get messy!

Reptile party – If you’ve got an animal lover that likes his critters on the scaly or slimy side, throw a Reptile party!

Find the perfect extramural activity

1. What is the goal of the programme? Is it for fun, mastery or competition? A shy, reserved child probably should not be in an environment where he or she is on show, such as tennis or gymnastics.
2. How much practice is necessary outside of lesson time? Music lessons, for example, call for almost daily practise whereas hockey, soccer, baseball and other sports generally require one game and one practice per week.
3. Is the environment safe, caring and stimulating? At all times, leaders should treat children with respect and honesty, using positive techniques to guide behaviour.
4. Those who coach or teach children, particularly younger children, should ensure the children have fun while learning the fundamentals. Look for an experienced teacher who is registered with a well-known organisation.

Eight tips on how to manage exam stress and pressure

Be prepared – Ensure you know what is expected from you in the exam and that you have all the notes, books and technological resources on hand.
Set up a study space – A comfortable space to study will increase your concentration and motivation levels.
Exercise – Research has shown that a 30-minute workout session boosts your health and brain function.
Create a study plan – You’ll also feel more in control of your studies.
Eat and drink well – Keep your
blood sugar levels steady to prevent
energy dips.
Divide your studying into smaller chunks – Study sessions are effective in shorter chunks of about 30 minutes over several weeks rather than crammed into a stretch.
Get enough sleep – Sleep helps
you absorb new knowledge into your memory.
Limit your distractions – No Facebook, Snapchat and Instagram while studying.

How do I know if my child has flu?

Children with colds usually have the energy to play and keep up their daily routines. Children with flu are usually in bed.
Typical flu symptoms include sudden fever, chills and shakes, headache, muscle aches, extreme fatigue, dry cough and sore throat and loss of appetite.
Newborns and babies may have a high fever that can’t be explained and no other signs of sickness.
Young children usually have temperatures over 39,5°C and may have convulsions.
Upset stomach and pain, vomiting, and diarrhoea are common in younger children. Earaches and red eyes are
also common.

Download these awesome educational apps to improve your child’s learning

Vocabla – Improving your English vocabulary.
Visual Anatomy – Loaded with high-resolution images detailing the human body.
WhizApp – The main subject that the app focuses on is mathematics.
Khan Academy – Offers over 10 000 educational videos that relate to subjects such as maths, science, economics, history, and a variety of others.
Complete Physics – Offers various tutorials for physics-related formulas and practicals.
Today in History Calendar – The app is packed full of interesting facts that relate to this day in history.

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